The Characteristics of Aspergers

Go down

The Characteristics of Aspergers

Post by Nicky on Thu Oct 02, 2008 2:26 pm

The characteristics of Asperger syndrome vary from one person to another but are generally divided into three main groups.

Difficulty with social communication

"If you have Asperger syndrome, understanding conversation is like trying to understand a foreign language."

People with Asperger syndrome sometimes find it difficult to express themselves emotionally and socially. For example, they may:

* have difficulty understanding gestures, facial expressions or tone of voice
* have difficulty knowing when to start or end a conversation and choosing topics to talk about
* use complex words and phrases but may not fully understand what they mean
* be very literal in what they say and can have difficulty understanding jokes, metaphor and sarcasm. For example, a person with Asperger syndrome may be confused by the phrase 'That's cool' when people use it to say something is good.


In order to help a person with Asperger syndrome understand you, keep your sentences short - be clear and concise.



~this was the best explaination I could find. And I'll talk from mine and Matt's experiences where I can.
Social commnication - I completely agree with what the NAS has said there. Matt could never understand the different tones people use in an expressional way, like if you're angry, or you're joking, it was really hard for him to notice the differences. Sarcasm is one of the hardest forms of communication for them. I always have to tell Matt if i am being saracastic. You have to talk to an Asperger in the factual sense they've come to understand. Its got to be quick blunt and straight to the point


Difficulty with social interaction

"I have difficulty picking up social cues, and difficulty in knowing what to do when I get things wrong."

Many people with Asperger syndrome want to be sociable but have difficulty with initiating and sustaining social relationships, which can make them very anxious. People with the condition may:

* struggle to make and maintain friendships
* not understand the unwritten 'social rules' that most of us pick up without thinking. For example, they may stand too close to another person, or start an inappropriate topic of conversation
* find other people unpredictable and confusing
* become withdrawn and seem uninterested in other people, appearing almost aloof
* behave in what may seem an inappropriate manner.


Same goes social interaction. Matthew has had great difficulty maintaining friendships as alot of peers have difficulties understanding the level of questions Matt asks them. Plus he doesn't understand them very well, either by the comments they make/the expressions they use. Plus Matt at the moment is having great problems understanding about that 'unwritten rule' as NAS describes it, about invading peoples personal space. His school is mentioning it alot lately in his home/school diary. He just doesn't understand that people have like a wall around them and that is their personal space. And that when u reach into that space, it comes across as threatnening. Matthew doesn't have any close friends at all.

Difficulty with social imagination

"We have trouble working out what other people know. We have more difficulty guessing what other people are thinking."

People with Asperger syndrome can be imaginative in the conventional use of the word. For example, many are accomplished writers, artists and musicians. But people with Asperger syndrome can have difficulty with social imagination. This can include:

* imagining alternative outcomes to situations and finding it hard to predict what will happen next
* understanding or interpreting other peoples thoughts, feelings or actions. The subtle messages that are put across by facial expression and body language are often missed
* having a limited range of imaginative activities, which can be pursued rigidly and repetitively eg lining up toys or collecting and organising things related to his or her interest.


Some children with Asperger syndrome may find it difficult to play 'let's pretend' games or prefer subjects rooted in logic and systems, such as mathematics.



Difficulty with social imagination - this is quite a hard one to understand really. Basically, a person with Aspergers have no awareness of consequences. For example : Matt is unaware that if he runs across a road without looking, listening - he could get ran over. that is the simplest way i can describe that really. Matt has absolutely no sense of danger or ever realises that an action is followed by a consequence.
* having a limited range of imaginative activities, which can be pursued rigidly and repetitively eg lining up toys or collecting and organising things related to his or her interest. meaning really...they develop obsessions about particular areas, like with Matt, hes obsessional about games, so we use them as rewards more than anything. But hes also obesessed with what he eats and how he eats it. So it can expressed in many different ways really.


Last edited by Nicky on Thu Oct 02, 2008 3:03 pm; edited 1 time in total

_________________
avatar
Nicky
Admin
Admin

Number of posts : 145
Age : 46
Blinkies :








Registration date : 2008-09-25

View user profile http://specialneedsfamilys.smileyforum.net

Back to top Go down

Other related charateristics

Post by Nicky on Thu Oct 02, 2008 2:56 pm

Love of routines

"If I get anxious I get in a tizz. I have a timetable; it helps me to see what I have to do next, otherwise I get confused."

To try and make the world less confusing, people with Asperger syndrome may have rules and rituals (ways of doing things) which they insist upon. Young children, for example, may insist on always walking the same way to school. In class, they may get upset if there is a sudden change to the timetable. People with Asperger syndrome often prefer to order their day to a set pattern. For example, if they work set hours, an unexpected delay to their journey to or from work can make them anxious or upset.


~from my experience with Matthew, he found the world a better place when we started sticking to very strict routines. For eg 7.30 Wake up 7.45-8am breakfast 8.10-transport to school and so on. He was much happier in a routine than he had before. He knows what to expect and when it is happening. If a routine is changed through no fault of his own, then he becomes greatly distressed and therefore has a really "bad day". It can be something as minute as the taxi was 2mins late. Hes waiting at the door dead on 8.10 and if its late, you should hear what he starts shouting at his escort. It causes him a great deal of distress. In his way, the day might as well end there, as it will be just a bad day, all day then. And it is extremely hard to maintain and stick to the routine, especially as the whole family is expected to maintain that whole routine as well.

Special interests

"I remember Samuel reciting the distances of all the planets from the sun to a baffled classmate in the playground when he was five. Since then he has had many obsessions, which he loves to talk about at length!"

People with Asperger syndrome may develop an intense, sometimes obsessive, interest in a hobby or collecting. Sometimes these interests are lifelong; in other cases, one interest is replaced by an unconnected interest. For example, a person with Asperger syndrome may focus on learning all there is to know about trains or computers. Some are exceptionally knowledgeable in their chosen field of interest. With encouragement, interests and skills can be developed so that people with Asperger syndrome can study or work in their favourite subjects.


~ For example, Matthew is obsessed with computer games. He can tell u exactly what u meant to do, where to go with a game that is like 10yrs old, for example, Zelda on the N64 when it first came out. He can remember the specifics of that game. Like where u get a certain type of sword, where u meant to go next and he can remember it to such small details. And all the others games since. Hes got thousands of games.

Sensory difficulties

"Robert only has problems with touch when he doesn't know what's coming - like jostling in queues and people accidentally brushing into him. Light touch seems to be worse for him than a firm touch."

People with Asperger syndrome may have sensory difficulties. These can occur in one or all of the senses (sight, sound, smell, touch, or taste). The degree of difficulty varies from one individual to another. Most commonly, an individual's senses are either intensified (over-sensitive) or underdeveloped (under-sensitive). For example, bright lights, loud noises, overpowering smells, particular food textures and the feeling of certain materials can be a cause of anxiety and pain for people with Asperger syndrome.

People with sensory sensitivity may also find it harder to use their body awareness system. This system tells us where our bodies are, so for those with reduced body awareness, it can be harder to navigate rooms avoiding obstructions, stand at an appropriate distance from other people and carry out 'fine motor' tasks such as tying shoelaces. Some people with Asperger syndrome may rock or spin to help with balance and posture or to help them deal with stress.


~for example, Matthew is extremely over-sensitive to certain noises. Like high pitch sounds or drills. He will sit there and start rocking like mad clutching his ears, screaming in pain. It is extremely painful for him. Bonfire night, Matt spends it hiding under his quilt with all his pillows over his head. It is an ordeal for him.
Same goes with food, they have to be really soft in texture. He will only eat certain types of foods and he has to see the brands as well. Or he just won't eat and there has even been times where hes gone about 2weeks without eating. He won't try anything new. He won't taste anything. He just will not do it. He would rather starve then try it.
Even things like his bed sheets must be completely straight all through the night. I call it hypersensitive, cos even the slightest turn in his sleep, causes him a great deal of distress. Plus he has to sleep at a certain temperature. It must be completely silent or he just won't sleep. And these are very typical with Aspergers.

_________________
avatar
Nicky
Admin
Admin

Number of posts : 145
Age : 46
Blinkies :








Registration date : 2008-09-25

View user profile http://specialneedsfamilys.smileyforum.net

Back to top Go down

Re: The Characteristics of Aspergers

Post by Nicky on Thu Oct 02, 2008 3:08 pm

These are all signs that the people who become involved in a child diagnosis's all look out for really. And these are how they are diagnosed.

So if u have any questions at all, please feel free to ask as I will try and help u as much as i possibly can.


After all the research and knowledge I know about Aspergers. I can tell now by watching a child for approximately 15mins wether he is an actual Asperger because they all behave as either a loner or they're overdramatising themselves. Its really hard to explain that really. But u can tell by watching a particular child from a certain age, wether they are aspergers or not.

_________________
avatar
Nicky
Admin
Admin

Number of posts : 145
Age : 46
Blinkies :








Registration date : 2008-09-25

View user profile http://specialneedsfamilys.smileyforum.net

Back to top Go down

Re: The Characteristics of Aspergers

Post by Sponsored content


Sponsored content


Back to top Go down

Back to top


 
Permissions in this forum:
You cannot reply to topics in this forum